Some Pics from the 8Radio.com Launch Party [27Mar2013]

A great crowd turned out for the 8Radio.com launch party at Whelans of Wexford Street last night.

8Radio.com goes live on FM in Dublin (94.3fm) Cork (106.7fm) and Limerick (105.5fm) from midnight on Friday night 22nd march 2013, broadcasting every weekend for 15 weeks, and ful-ltime online.

All pictures taken by Claude Lamothe.

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Who “eight” all the cake?  8Radio.com founder Simon Maher, that’s who!

Pearl and Steve enjoying the evening.

Presenters Pearl and Steve enjoying the evening.

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Presenters Amber & Steve meet Aisling Maher

Musician turned broadcaster Neil singing for his supper.

Musician turned broadcaster Neil Murray singing for his supper.

A wide range of ages and background on the station, old hands and fresh faces. Steve with Emer.

A wide range of ages and background on the station, old hands and fresh faces. Steve with Emer.

Of those pictured above:

Steve will be on air every Saturday night 11pm to 2am.

Pearl can be heard Sunday mornings 9am-midday.

Neil is Sunday 3-6pm.

Amber is on late Friday night/Saturday morning midnight to 2am.

For details on this new station including full schedule, webstreams, apps, visit 8Radio.com


Live Reading, Dublin, Thursday 14th March 2013 – “Television”

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After a short break from the live scene due to a hectic schedule last year, I am delighted to be returning to public readings as part of a special themed event at The Workmans Club, Wellington Quay, in Dublin City Centre.

Hosted by Seven Towers, this is a short evening event kicking off at 6.30pm, with writers and poets including Orla Martin, Phil Lynch, Eamonn Lynsky and myself exploring the theme of “Television“.

Full details at www.seventowers.ie

Steve


The Day I Realised I Was One Of THEM

I was always on the rebel side.

It was Us versus Them, the forces of rock and roll and musical freedom struggling against the older generation, those in power, the corporate and musical estblishment whose music was of a bygone age. I was always on the side of “Us” and would never change. Or so I thought . .

Of course, my friend and onetime Caroline colleague Christopher England would tell me differently. Chris has many hobby horses, and one of them is a dislike of “oldie music” and a disdain for how quickly the new young thrusting generation become oldies themselves, despising newer music from a younger generation, and believing that theirs was the only true generation of revolution.  Chris talks about this a lot, but it was not Chris who brought me to see the error of my ways, though funnily enough my moment of realisation did come when I was in his company, sitting beside him in a darkened theatre in central London, waiting for a tech launch.

Chris is my tech mentor in life you see. Even though I have been involved in IT for more than 30 years, and have worked either directly or on projects for the biggest names in the business – Microsoft, Apple, Dell, Compaq, HP – Chris has always been at least two steps ahead of me when it comes to living in the future.

My first ever mobile phone? Reccomended and procured for me by Chris (who had earlier got me into that great yuppie trend of the late 80s, the pager).

It was Chris who told me about the Orange network, which had this unique new geeky feature not available on any other network, the facility to send short SMS text messages. My first messages were to and from Chris.

Christopher England, in hiding.

When, at a technology exhibition in Earls Court in 1992 I tried out a very early video-phone on the BT stand, it was Chris who was the blocky, pixellated face at the other end, jerking around at a rate of about 2 or 3 frames per second (or that’s what it seemed like anyway).  Skype was far, far in the future in those days.

It was Chris who first mentioned some weird tech start up called Twitter, long before it was anything other than a curiosity, and at least two years before it became mainstream.

Not all of his playthings went on to success however. I vividly remember a huge, multi-caller, interactive premium-rate phoneline called “The Villa” which he was an administrator of, into which you could dial if you wanted to meet and interact with people. By pressing commands on the phone you could go into different areas of the villa, meet different people in different rooms, play games, chat etc. It was woefully clunky and terribly expensive, but I can’t help thinking back to it when I see some of the interactions on Facebook.

And so it was that when Microsoft were launching their huge step forward that was Windows 95, it was Chris that I was sitting beside in a large theatre or other such place somewhere in central London. I can’t remember the exact date, but a look back at the launch schedule for Windows 95 tells me that this must have been sometime around, or just before, August 1995.

As we sat waiting for the show to begin, I was very pleased to hear a Rolling Stones track “Start Me Up” being played. (of course, prior to the launch we would not have known that this was a planned part of the whole Win95 theme, in reference to the “Start” menu).

I remember thinking that, after years of big corporate giants being very conservative and oldies focussed in their music for events like this, that it was great that finally they were moving forward, and recognising the value of “our” generation’s music, being young and rebellious, rather than middle aged. Maybe we were winning our battles after all!

And then it hit me, and that one single moment changed my whole worldview on music. This was not big business recognising the value of youthful rebellious music. This was my generation, and our music having been around for long enough that people of my age were now moving up into positions of corporate and government responsibility. This was my generation’s music, in effect, becoming the new “safe” choice, favoured by people drifting towards middle age. This was the moment that I realised that, without so much as a whisper of warning, time had played the cruellest trick of all, and now “we” were becoming “them”.

And sure enough, the signs were there. A new generation of music bubbling under that was not really listened to by my generation, the fact that our music was now increasingly playlisted on mainstream radio . .

From that day on, I could see the truth in Christopher England’s polemic about how closed people’s minds became to everything new over time, and I resolved to think and act differently myself.  And this was a good time to do it, as around about the same time as Microsoft was launching Windows 95 another giant was rethinking its strategy, as the BBC started a revemp of Radio 1, to howls of protest from established presenters and audience, that would see a new generation of presenters coming on board, bringing with them the new wave of dance, rock and alternative sounds that had been there, but ignored for quite some time.

Later I was to end up at Phantom FM in Dublin, where for 11 years I was constantly fed a diet of new bands and live gigs. That really helped me to stay up to date, and I couldn’t help but smile when, on the station’s message board in the mid noughties, I saw listeners complaining about how the new music it was playing now was not the same as the new music it had been playing five years earlier.

“They are playing crap aimed at 16 year olds” these 21 year olds would complain, “not like when we were 16, the music was much better then”.

Having recently left Phantom to strike out on my own, I’m working harder than ever to keep up to date on new music, and try to feature a minimum of 50% new material on my shows each week on Radio Seagull. I don’t have the dislike of oldies that Chris has, but on the other hand I don’t have the dislike of modern music that so many of my contemporaries seem to have grown into.

And, though it is itself an “oldie” now in computing terms,  that’s as good a reason to be thankful for Windows 95 as any.

Steve


Special Reading & Talk to commemorate 20 Years Since The Goodwins Shipwreck

20 years on from the most terrifying morning of my life . . aground on the Goodwin Sands with hopes of rescue seemingly dashed as the crew of the Ross Revenge shook hands and prepared for the ship to roll over . . .

Shiprocked - Life On The Waves with Radio Caroline

Seven Towers Agency, East Wall for All and The Sean O’Casey Community Centre present:

Radio Caroline, former Phantom FM DJ and Best Selling Author

Steve Conway

Reading from his book

Shiprocked, Life on the Waves With Radio Caroline

Sean O’Casey Community Centre, East Wall, Dublin.

7pm Monday 21 November

free parking, admission free

20 Years ago this November, Dubliner and East Wall resident Steve Conway  survived the shipwreck of the Ross Revenge, the last of the Radio Caroline off-shore Radio Ships.   Reading from his book, Shiprocked he tells of this event and of his life on the famous Pirate Station, Radio Caroline.

Steve will also read a preview excerpt from his new book, due out next year, that covers his career beyond Caroline, including the 10 years spent working for Dublin’s alternative station Phantom FM / Phantom 105.2

This event is free, but an opportunity will be available to give donations and to RNLI and Sean O’Casey Community Centre.



Up Next: Book 2 Preview

Exciting news: a publication date for my second book will be announced shortly, and it looks like it will be towards the end of this year.

If you’d like a preview of my new writing, as well as a taste of my recent short stories as well as something from my first book Shiprocked, I’ll be giving a special reading in Dublin on Saturday 16th July.

3pm downstairs at The Twisted Pepper, Abbey Street.

Steve

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Going Offshore with Seagull in June

LV Jenni Baynton, showing light tower and radio mast.

That time of year has come around again – the annual excursion by the Dutch broadcaster Radio Seagull when it puts out to sea for a month on the former lightship which acts as a studio and transmission base for both Seagull and its sister station Radio Waddenzee.

The Jenni Baynton will be anchored 8 miles offshore from the coastal town of Harlingen and transmitting on 1602Khz AM, with the usual internet feeds.

I will be living on board from June 2nd to 13th, a longer period than last year, and I’m really looking forward to getting the chance to indulge in my love of all things maritime, and rubbing shoulders and exchanging musical ideas with the other Seagull and Waddenzee staff, which will hopefully result in some fine programmes. The ship itself will be offshore until the end of the month, including some time spent located at the island of Terschelling for a local festival.

For the duration of my stay on the ship, I will be on air nightly at 7-10pm local time (6-9pm Irish/UK time), every day except Friday 3rd.

I’ll blog regularly from the ship when mobile reception permits, and I’m also hoping the peaceful atmosphere on board will lend itself to some quality writing time also, as I’m way behind on my second book.

Further details next week.

www.radioseagull.com

Steve


All Aboard for Caroline at Easter

The Ross Revenge at Tilbury Docks in 2010

 

This Easter Radio Caroline calebrates its 47th birthday with an 11-day long live broadcast from the Ross Revenge, the pirate ship that was my home for so many action-packed years offshore in the 1980s.

Starting at 7am on Good Friday and running right though until midnight on May Day Bank Holiday Monday all shows will be coming live from the ship, which is currently berthed in the secure shipping terminal at Tilbury, Essex. . You’ll be able to tune in as usual via SKY 0199 and our web streams (and via UPC cable in Ireland). However we will also be broadcasting to south Essex and north Kent for the duration on 531 kHz AM.

All crew will live onboard for the duration, and I’m thrilled to be involved in this event, although due to other work commitments I can only stay on board for a week as opposed to the full 11 days. But there will be plenty to listen to for the whole broadcast, including special features in addition to the station’s unique album format.

The Birthday Bash will also include the annual Radio Caroline Support Group Membership Drive. There’ll be free gifts for those who join or make a minimum donation, one of which is an exclusive T Shirt only available for the duration of the broadcast.

A couple of the highlights of the broadcast are 60s Caroline DJ Tom Lodge‘s Favourite Intro Guitar Riffs and a special classic albums of the 60’s & 70’s show which will be hosted by myself.

I will be live on Caroline every night for the week, starting with a 9pm-midnight show on Good Friday.

My show times as below:

Good Friday April 22nd – 9pm to midnight

Saturday April 23rd – 10pm to midnight

Easter Sunday April 24th – midnight to 3am (i.e. early hours Monday morning)

Easter Monday April 25th – 4pm to 7pm (on AM only, not Satelitte/cable)

Tuesday April 26th – 9pm to midnight with special 60s and 70s album show (listeners best albums)

Wednesday April 27th – 9pm to midnight

Thursday April 28th – 9pm to midnight

The original Caroline studio (Studio 1) on the Ross Revenge

It’ll be my first time living on board the Ross in more than a decade, and I’m looking forward to the intensity of creative juices that this unusual environment engenders, along with the company of good companions. I have never yet stepped off that ship after a stint on board without being changed in some way, and long may it continue.

Steve


Hammersmith Reading, Sunday 24th Aug

The Hammersmith Ram, King Street, Hammersmith


6pm, Sunday 24th August 2010, Seven Towers reading and open-mic. All welcome.

Tomorrow I will be reading at this London even alongside fellow Irish writer and poet Eamon Lynsky, poet Graham Buchan and performance poet Yetibetti.

I will be reading a new lighthearted short story (fiction) and possibly some extracts from Shiprocked – Life On The waves with Radio Caroline.

The Hammersmith Ram is really easy to access by public transport – it is 4 minutes walk from Hammersmith Tube station (on the Piccadilly, District and Hammersmith & City lines) and Hammersmith Bus Station (main routes include the 9 and 10 from central London, and west London routes including the H91 and 266)

The other readers:

Graham Buchan graduated as a Chemical Engineer. He then had a career as an editor, writer, producer and director in the UK and US film industries. Now he writes poetry, short stories and reviews, and he facilitates a Creative Writing group for people with mental health issues. The ‘the tall-lighthouse’ has published his collections ‘Airport Reading’, ‘There is Violence in these Vapours’ and ‘In Bed with Shostakovich’

Yetibetti is a 29 year old aspiring performance poet, originally from the East Midlands but has been living in the London area for about 8 years, originally coming down for university. It was only recently she tapped into the London scene through nights such as Poetry Unplugged at the Poetry Cafe and found both writing adn performing addictive. She has a full time demanding office job and so writes in the margins. She believes in ‘person first – poetry second’ and although she appreciates many contemporary and classical poets she really admires anyone who can make her think, smile and hold her attention, such as Jarvis Cocker and the Artic Monkeys.

Éamonn Lynskey has had poems published in many magazines. He was nominated for the Sunday Tribune/Hennessy Literary Award for New Irish Poetry in 2006 and one of his poems will feature on the 2009 OXFAM calendar. His first collection Dispatches and Recollections was published in 1998 and he is currently working on his second And Suddenly the Sun Again to be published in May 2010. Eamonn’s work is also featured in Census, The First Seven Towers Anthology and Census, The second Seven Towers Anthology. . Eamonn has also translated works of Italian poets Montale and Valeri and written in Italian – he holds a Diploma in Italian Lauguage and Culture from the Italian Institute, Dublin. His second collection, And Suddenly the Sun Again has just been published by Seven Towers.


August Bank Holiday weekend (1st-3rd)

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Although for the most part fully occupied on my new book project at the moment, I will still be heard on Phantom 105.2 from time to time.

This weekend I am filling two slots – 8am to 11am on Saturday 1st August, and 1-5pm on the (Irish) Bank Holiday Monday 3rd August. You can listen locally in the Dublin region on 105.2fm, nationally via UPC cable ch.935, and worldwide at www.phantom.ie

On Sunday 2nd August I will be taking time out to MC a themed open-mic event for Seven Towers  – “Both Sides Of The Pond” – featuring American, Canadian and Irish poets.  It’s at 2pm, Cassidys of Westmoreland Street, free admission, all welcome.

Readers include Californian poet Lynne Knight, Dublin writer Oran Ryan, New Zealand born Dublin writer, Ross Hattaway, Canadian writer and model Roslyn Fuller, Dublin poet Eamonn Lynskey, Dublin poet Catherine Ann Cullen. Other names will be added to the list as they are confirmed


Galway reading (Ocean Race)

READING FOR VOLVO OCEAN RACE, GALWAY, SAT 6TH JUNE 2009

Seven Towers Press Release

We would like to invite you, your friends and guests to a wine reception and reading to celebrate the recent launch of ‘Shiprocked, Life on the Waves with Radio Caroline’ by Steve Conway, in the City Museum in Spanish Parade in Galway at 3.30pm on the 6th of June – just after the boats leave the bay.

Steve Conway, a former newsreader, DJ and programme controller on the famous pirate station Radio Caroline has just released this ciritcally acclaimed memoir – described as ‘the radio obsessive’s version of Nick Hornby’s ‘Fever Pitch” by the Sunday Business Post; as ‘hard to resist’ by the RTE Guide and former Galway Bay abd current 4FM presenter Gareth O’Callaghan praises ‘Steve’s wonderful ability to tell stories and create pictures’.

Steve will also have a thing or two to share about life on the high seas, and the perils that are likely to face the the sailors who have just left the bay – including treachorous currents, high and sometimes unpredictable winds – and the possibility of running out of chocolate.

You will also be given a chance to donate to the brave members of the RNLI who daily risk their lives to rescue people on the seas around Ireland and England and €1 from each book sold on the day will be donated to the RNLI

You can RSVP to this email address, which can also be used to send your messages on to Steve.

Steve’s agent can also be contacted  on 0872283351.

Looking forward to seeing you there
Best regards
Sarah Lundberg
www.seventowers.ie


Quo Day goes down a storm

Dublin band Heavy Traffic played two hours of Quo classics

Dublin band Heavy Traffic played two hours of Quo classics

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I was delighted to be invited down to Port Laois on Saturday to introduce the band at Ireland’s first annual “Quo-Day” at Cloisters pub.

Around 150 turned up for the event, which featured Status Quo concert footage playing on a big plasma screen during the evening, with two hours of live music from tribute band Heavy Traffic in a marquee outside which went down very well with both older and younger fans. The band really knew their material, and threw themselves into the performance with gusto.

A nice touch was starting their set with “Caroline” after my introduction!

Hopefully this even will grow year on year.

Steve


QuoDay – Port Laois, May 16th

Got this email today from a regular Phantom listener.

Quoday

I know Quo aren’t everyone’s cup of tea but no-one actually knows anything but the chart hits. Anyway see pic included. A mate and i decided to give this a go, England and Europe have regular Quo days so why not here. The band lined up are Heavy Traffic from south Dublin who have put together a setlist of Quo album tracks from as far back as Piledriver so this is a perfect day for Quo fans and also for the knockers who have always slagged them off, a chance to hear what /quo are really all about. The gig is in Cloisters pub, Portlaoise on May 16th,

Mick

Sounds like it will be fun, especially if they are playing good covers of the lesser-known Quo stuff.  I’m on-air 5-7pm next Saturday, but might head down afterwards in time to catch the gig.

Hope it goes well.

Steve


Shiprocked: Dublin Launch pictures

The official Irish launch of SHIPROCKED – Life On The Waves With Radio Caroline took place on April 15th, attended by a good crowd including many from the world of radio in Ireland.

The book is now available in all major bookstores, including Easons, Hughes & Hughes, Chapters, Hodges Figgis, as well as through the major online retailers.

The evening launch was preceeded by a lunchtime reading at Chapters bookstore in Parnell Street

The evening launch was preceeded by a lunchtime reading at Chapters bookstore in Parnell Street

Declan Meehan was one of a number of old pirate faces who attended the launch party

Declan Meehan was one of a number of old pirate faces who attended the launch party

Shiprocked launch at Cassidy's Bar

Shiprocked launch at Cassidy's Bar

Caroline and Ross Revenge posters were displayed throughout the venue

Caroline and Ross Revenge posters were displayed throughout the venue

The radio t-shirt line-up with Phantom 105.2 staff (left to right) Ger Roe, Fiona Scally, Steve Conway, Anne Marie (in Radio Jackie t-shirt!), Sinister Pete and Pearl

The radio t-shirt line-up with Phantom 105.2 staff (left to right) Ger Roe, Fiona Scally, Steve Conway, Anne Marie (in Radio Jackie t-shirt!), Sinister Pete and Pearl


Visit to Pirate BBC Essex

The BBC are celebrating the 45th anniversary of Radio Caroline‘s launch in 1964 by running a special “pirate” station from a former lightship at Harwich Pier all over the Easter weekend – see details and listen here.

Pirate BBC Essex from the LV18, seen on Good Friday

Pirate BBC Essex from the LV18, seen on Good Friday

It’s great fun to listen to, they have got a lot of the original 60s presenters from the various offshore stations, and are drawing huge crowds down to the pier, and lots of listeners around the UK and further afield.

As part of my UK visit to promote the book I called in to the Radio Caroline sales stand that is nearby to deliver and sign more books, and was delighted to be invited on board the ship to be interviewed on Pirate BBC Essex about the publication.

I also caught up with many old friends from the Caroline days, including Roger Day,  Albert & Georgina Hood who used to run tenders, and now run the sales stand, ex Caroline and Laser engineer Mike Barrington, Paul Grahame and the Balls brothers.

Myself with Roger Day and his Ronan O'Rahilly T-shirt!

Myself with Roger Day and his Ronan O'Rahilly T-shirt!

Signing copies of Shiprocked at the Radio Caroline sales stand. In the background is Mike Barrington, former engineer for both Caroline and Laser

Signing copies of Shiprocked at the Radio Caroline sales stand. In the background is Mike Barrington, former engineer for both Caroline and Laser

Don’t forget that Radio Caroline themselves have special broadcasts over the Easter weekend, live from the Ross Revenge, though sadly the ship i not accessible for visitors.


Bits

The “Love & Chocolate” reading in Tralee went very well, and made for an enjoyable afternoon, even if I am shattered after the 600km return drive.

In addition to my normal Sunday evening show on Phantom, I will be interviewed on NEAR FM in Dublin tomorrow, Monday 16th Feb 2009, sometime between 12 and 1.

Very close to the final proof of the book now, just writing the acknowledgements!

Steve


Feb 2009 events from Seven Towers

Seven Towers, the Dublin-based publisher and literary agency have a host of events taking place throughout February 2009, in addition to their regular “Last Wednesday” open mic night.

Seven Towers represent me for my forthcoming book “Shiprocked – Life On The Waves With Radio Caroline” which will be published by Liberties Press on March 31st, and I’ll be reading passages from the book at a number of these events.

Highlights for the month:

Wednesday 11th February 9-10 am – Hear Eamon Carr – acclaimed poet, musician and broadcaster and author of The Origami Crow, Journey into Japan, Word Cup Summer 2002 chatting with Dave Fanning on The Tubridy show – about Beat poets, and other interesting happenings – including the publication of Eamon’s first book, the aforementioned The Origami Crow.

 First themed reading of 09 Chapters of Parnell Street, Dublin 12 Feb 6.30pm – Valentine’s reading – ‘My love is like . . . ‘ with Barbara Smith, Steve Conway, Oran Ryan, Noel Ó Briain, Ross Hattaway, Anne Moran, Catherine Ann Cullen.

 And for anyone spending a Valentine’s weekend in Kerry, there will be a Census launch and Valentine’s reading on the theme of Love and Chocolate in Rueben’s Cafe on Ashe St in Tralee at 2.30 on Sat 14th Feb, with Oran Ryan, Steve Conway, Noel King, John W Sexton, Tommy Frank O’Connor, Eileen Sheehan.

 On 18th February  (1.15 Chapters of Parnell Street) the lunchtime reading will feature bi-lingual poet Greagoir Ó Duill  and Donal Moloney.

 Keep an eye out for other events – including 24th Feb 9pm – RÁ performance poetry event at with Raven and Sweeney and special guest this month is London performance poet and rapper Martin Dawes.

 And on  23rd February at O Bheal in the Upstairs at The Long Valley, Winthrop Street, Cork, Eamonn Lynskey will be reading and performing.

 And on 25th February the Last Wednesday Series Reading and Open Mic at Cassidy’s of Westmorland Street, Dublin, featuring a full lineup of Seven Towers writers and guests. Regular readers include Oran Ryan, Ross Hathaway, Steve Conway, Noel O’Brien, Eamon Lynsky, Donal Moloney and more.  Doors open 7pm, admission free, all welcome.

Further details of Seven Towers events at www.seventowers.ie

Steve


Readings: tonight and Saturday

Tonight (Wednesday 28th Jan 2009) I’ll be at the regular Last Wednesday writers open mic hosted by Seven Towers, along with a huge selection of poets and prose writers. I’ll be reading a newly written short story “Of Little Consequence”.

Last Wednesday takes place every last Wednesday at 7.30pm, in Cassidy’s of Westmorland Street – more details at www.seventowers.ie

Last Wednesday Series Reading and Open Mic
January 28, 2009 (7:30 pm – 9:30 pm)
(Open Mic Night) First Seven Towers event of 2009. 7.30 in Cassidy’s of Westmoreland St. Our regular reading and open mic with Steve Conway, Ross Hattaway, Eamon Lynskey, Donal Moloney, Noel O Briain, Oran Ryan among others!

On Saturday 31st Jan I’ll be taking part in a special day of fundraising for the RNLI, with a reading at the Pavillion in Dun Laoghaire at 3pm, featuring the grounding/rescue story from my forthcoming book Shiprocked.

Also reading will be the poet Ross Hathaway.


Seven Towers events for October 2008

October events from Seven Towers


Prejudice and identity – A Literary dialogue
at 1.15 on Wednesday 15th October
Chapters of Parnell St, Dublin 1
Featuring
Oran Ryan and Doog Wood

Oran Ryan is a novelist, poet and playwright from Dublin. His first two novels, The Death of Finn and Ten Short Novels by Arthur Kruger were published by Seven Towers in 2006. In 2008 Oran was awarded an Arts Council Bursary for his current work, Bradbury. Oran was called “a new and powerful voice in Irish Literature” by Seamus Cashman.

Doog Wood is a Dublin based poet from North Carolina, with a unique and original voice. His work has been published in journals and anthologies all over the world. His first full collection will be published by The Seven Towers Agency in 2009.

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Friday 24th October ,

1.15pm

Chapters and Verse Lunchtime Reading

Chapters Bookstore, Parnell St, Dublin 1

Ross Hattaway, Ann Marie Glasheen, Greagoir O’Duill

Anne Marie Glasheen is a London based poet, photographic artist and translator. She was Poet/Photographer in residence at Peckham Library, May-June 2005, as part of Southwark’s WriteStuff! Literature Festival and in 2005-2006 was Project Programmer of Words Unbound, International Writers Exchange, Canterbury City Council . She won the 2007 Bradshaw manuscript prize and her first collection will be launched in October 2008.

Ross Hattaway was born in Wellington New Zealand, but has lived in Ireland since 1990. He has had many varied jobs and currently works as a civil servant. His first collection of poetry, The Gentle Art of Rotting was published by Seven Towers in 2006. Ross toured Lithuania earlier this year, as part of the Poetry Spring Festival 2008 and his work was translated into Lithuanian.

Greagoir Ó Duill was born in Dublin but grew up outside Belfast. He was educated in Queen’s University, Belfast and UCD and took a PhD in English in Maynooth. He recently moved to Waterford to set up postgraduate creative writing in Waterfor Institute of Technology.

His own work has included eight collections of poetry, two anthologies, a critical biography and a collection of short stories, and he has taken prizes in poetry, short fiction and criticism. His work is widely anthologised and has been translated into the major European languages – most recently with a full-length collection of versions in English by Bernie Kenny called Gone to Earth. He has read from Cork to Stornoway to Palermo to New York.

Greagoir is an Irish language adviser and Irish language reviewer of Poetry Ireland Review. He has recently started to write in English and has been widely published in journals in Ireland, Britain and the United States. New Room Windows is Gréagóir’s first all english poetry publication

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LAST WEDNESDAY OPEN MIC – Wed 29th October 2008

Cassidy’s Westmorland street, 7pm

Journalist, broadcaster, critic, commentator, musician and poet Eamon Carr will be reading from his latest work The Origami Crow,Journey into Japan, World Cup Summer 2002 at the Seven Towers Event – The Last Wednesday Series Reading and open mic on the 29th October 2008 at Cassidys of Westmoreland St, Dublin 2. The event commences at 7.30pm.

As a sports columnist for a Dublin daily, journalist Eamon Carr watched the unfolding drama of the 2002 World Cup finals firsthand in Japan. Yet against the intense public spectacle of media attention following the controversial departure of Ireland captain Roy Keane, Carr followed his own private journey – a lifelong quest to visit the shrines and places of the famed poet Matsuo Basho, recognized master of haiku.

In a volume of spare, elegant prose and his own haiku chronicling impressions and revelations of that journey, Carr explores the deep interrelationships found within the seeming contrasts of ancient and modern, nation and individual, crowd and solitude, loss and victory. Histories, memories and legends, as well as the wry personal observations of the weary working traveller, merge to create this profoundly moving narrative on the universal nature of grace and redemption.

The Origami Crow: Journey into Japan, World Cup Summer 2002 is Eamon Carr’s first collection of poetry and the profundity and depth of the work is a just reward for the long wait. The book is a collection of prose poems and Haiku following Eamon’s life experience, his journey into Japan that fateful Summer to follow the footsteps of Basho and is set against the backdrop of the Irish World Cup experience in Japan in Summer 2002. This is an exciting book because of the beauty of the work itself, and its significance as another important milestone in the work of a great artist and a man who truly has the soul of a poet.

Eamon Carr has been a significant figure in the Irish artistic and cultural scene for many years. In the late 1960s he co-founded Tara Telephone, the music and poetry group of the Dublin beat scene. Tara Telephone published everyone from Marc Bolan to Allan Ginsberg, Brian Patten, Seamus Heaney, Pearse Hutchinson, Eilean Ni Chuilleanain, Brendan Kennelly, Adrian Mitchell, Pete Brown in their magazines and broadsheets. The group also ran recitals. Among those who read with Tara Telephone, in addition to Eamon and Peter Fallon were Phil Lynott and Roger McGough. With Jim Fitzpatrick, the group also produced specially designed posters with artwork and poems combined. One of these posters with Eamon’s poem ‘A Tale of Love’ was exhibited in the Tate Gallery, Liverpool, Summer of Love: Art of the Psychedelic Era Exhibition in 2005 which also toured in Germany and Austria.

Following on from Tara Telephone, in the 1970’s Eamon co-founded Horslips, the hugely influential band which is credited with creating the musical genre known as Celtic Rock, and in which he is also a drummer, conceptualist and lyricist. Eamon has also promoted musicians and artists, and works as a journalist, writer and commentator on culture, politics, arts, music and sport as well as an award winning broadcaster. He was born in Co. Meath and lives in Dublin.

Other readers at the event are

Featured Readers: Phantom FM DJ Steve Conway, Waterford writer Donal Moloney, New Zealand born poet Ross Hattaway, Kerry born Wexford based producer, director, actor, playwritght and poet Noel Ó Briain, Dublin novelist, poet, playwright and screenwriter Oran Ryan, North Carolina poet Doog Wood, Dublin poet Eamonn Lynskey and poet Patrick Chapman

Patrick Chapman was born in 1968. His poetry collections are Jazztown (Raven Arts Press, Dublin, 1991), The New Pornography (Salmon Poetry, Co. Clare, 1996), Breaking Hearts and Traffic Lights (Salmon Poetry, Co. Clare, 2007) and A Shopping Mall on Mars (BlazeVOX Books, New York, 2008). He has also written a collection of stories, The Wow Signal (Bluechrome, 2007); an audio drama, Doctor Who: Fear of the Daleks; and an award-winning film, Burning the Bed (2003), which starred Gina McKee and Aidan Gillen. He won first prize for a story in the 2003 Cinescape Genre Literary Awards. With Philip Casey, he co-founded the Irish Literary Revival website. He lives in Dublin.

Ross Hattaway was born in Wellington New Zealand, but has lived in Ireland since 1990. He has had many varied jobs and currently works as a civil servant. His first collection of poetry, The Gentle Art of Rotting was published by Seven Towers in 2006. This will be Ross’ first reading in Dublin, after touring Lithuania as part of the Poetry Spring Festival 2008 and seeing his work translated into Lithuanian.

Ross Hattaway was born in Wellington New Zealand, but has lived in Ireland since 1990. He has had many varied jobs and currently works as a civil servant. His first collection of poetry, The Gentle Art of Rotting was published by Seven Towers in 2006. This will be Ross’ first reading in Dublin, after touring Lithuania as part of the Poetry Spring Festival 2008 and seeing his work translated into Lithuanian

Eamonn Lynskey has had poems published in many magazines. He was nominated for the Sunday Tribune/Hennessy Literary Award for New Irish Poetry in 2006 and one of his poems will feature on the 2009 OXFAM calendar. His first collection Dispatches and Recollections was published in 1998 and he is currently working onhis second. As well as writing in English, Eamonn has also translated works of Italian poets Montale and Valeri and written in Italian – he holds, (among other qualifications!) a Diploma in Italian Lauguage and Culture from the Italian Institute, Dublin.

Dónal Moloney was born in 1976 and comes from Waterford. He has been writing seriously for ten years, during which time he has written a novel, several novellas and many short stories and poems. He is currently completing a collection of three novellas. He works as a freelance translator and lives in Dublin. He is a regular featured reader at both Chapters and Verse Reading Series and The Last Wednesday Reading and Open Mic Series. Donal is represented by The Seven Towers Agency.

Noel Ó Briain was born in Kerry, grew up in Dublin and now lives in Camolin, Wexford. He is a playwright and poet and a former head of drama at RTE. He has worked for many years in theatre, radio and television as an actor, producer/director, designer and script editor.He played the part of Cranly in the premier of Hugh Leonard’s Stephen D (an adaptation of Joyce’s Portrait of The Artist as a Young Man) at the Gate Theatre. He also played the part of the IRA officer in the premier of Brendan Behan’s An Giall in the Damer Hall in Dublin and designed the set for this production. The play was later translated into English as The Hostage and staged at The Royal Theatre Stratford by Joan Littlewood.He has produced and directed many plays in the Damer Hall under the auspices of Gael Linn. Among others these included Gunna Cam agus Slabhra Óir by Seán Ó Tuama and Aggiornamento by Chriostóir Ó Floinn. He also designed the sets for these and many other production. He has directed Ulick O’Connor’s Noh Plays at The Project. As a Radio Producer his drama productions have been selected as RTE’s entries for the Prix Italia.

He has won a National Jacob’s Award for his production and adaptation of Seán Ó Tuama’s Judas Iscariot agus a Bhean.

He has worked as Producer, Director, Series Producer and Script Editor in numerous television one-offs, series and serial drama, often combining several of these skills in one production. These have included The Riordans, Bracken (which launched the career of Gabriel Byrne) Glenroe and Ros na Rún among many others. He also produced and directed the controversial series The Spike until it was withdrawn by RTE itself after complaints from the League of Decency and State interference. He has participated in a documentary in the Scannal series on RTE which deals with well known Irish scandals – including The Spike! (to be transmitted in Autumn 2008). He has won the Celtic Film Festival Drama Award for his production of Tom Murphy’s screenplay, Brigit. He has devised and conducted numerous screenwriting courses. Among these was the initial course for the development of new writers for the series Ros na Rún on TG4. He has conducted several screen acting courses both independently and for the Gaiety School of Acting. His poetry and short stories have been published in a number of literary magazines including The Kilkenny Magazine and Poetry Ireland. They have also been broadcast on radio in the short story slot and on Sunday Miscellany. His poetry collection Scattering Day 21 Sonnets and Other Poems was published by Seven Towers in 2007.Noel has two plays currently completed:

The Land of She: An adapted for theatre translation of Brian Merriman’s Cuirt on Mhean Oiche, this hillarious play is written for five parts.

He has also completed a short verse play inspired by Synge’s Deirdre of The Sorrows, entitled Áinle and Árdán Are Already Dead.

Oran Ryan is a novelist, poet and playwright from Dublin. He has had poems, short stories and literary critical articles published in various magazines. His first two novels, The Death of Finn and Ten Short Novels by Arthur Kruger were published by Seven Towers in 2006. He is currently working on his fifth novel and had three plays and two screenplays in pre-production. Oran won a 2008 Arts Council Bursary Award.

Doog Wood is a Dublin based poet from North Carolina. His poetry has been widely published in journals and anthologies. His first full collection will be published by The Seven Towers Agency in 2009.

And of course, myself . . .

Steve


Last Wednesday: Shipwrecked

It’s that time again – the monthly “Last Wednesday” open-mic evening for Irish writers, is on tomorrow, Wednesday 24th September 2008, at Cassidy’s of Westmorland Street in Dublin City Centre.

The event is hosted by the Seven Towers Agency and includes poetry, fiction and nonfiction writing.

Apart from myself, readers will include Doog Wood, Oran Ryan, Eamonn Lynskey, Noel Ó Briain, Donal Moloney and Ross Hattaway.

Ross Hattaway was born in Wellington New Zealand, but has lived in Ireland since 1990. He has had many varied jobs and currently works as a civil servant. His first collection of poetry, The Gentle Art of Rotting was published by Seven Towers in 2006. This will be Ross’ first reading in Dublin, after touring Lithuania as part of the Poetry Spring Festival 2008 and seeing his work translated into Lithuanian.

Eamon Lynskey has had poems published in many magazines. He was nominated for the Sunday Tribune/Hennessy Literary Award for New Irish Poetry in 2006 and one of his poems will feature on the 2009 OXFAM calendar. His first collection Dispatches and Recollections was published in 1998 and he is currently working onhis second. As well as writing in English, Eamonn has also translated works of Italian poets Montale and Valeri and written in Italian – he holds, (among other qualifications!) a Diploma in Italian Lauguage and Culture from the Italian Institute, Dublin.

Dónal Moloney was born in 1976 and comes from Waterford. He has been writing seriously for ten years, during which time he has written a novel, several novellas and many short stories and poems. He is currently completing a collection of three novellas. He works as a freelance translator and lives in Dublin. He is a regular featured reader at both Chapters and Verse Reading Series and The Last Wednesday Reading and Open Mic Series. Donal is represented by The Seven Towers Agency.

Noel Ó Briain was born in Kerry, grew up in Dublin and now lives in Camolin, Wexford. He is a playwright and poet and a former head of drama at RTE. He has worked for many years in theatre, radio and television as an actor, producer/director, designer and script editor.

He played the part of Cranly in the premier of Hugh Leonard’s Stephen D (an adaptation of Joyce’s Portrait of The Artist as a Young Man) at the Gate Theatre. He also played the part of the IRA officer in the premier of Brendan Behan’s An Giall in the Damer Hall in Dublin and designed the set for this production. The play was later translated into English as The Hostage and staged at The Royal Theatre Stratford by Joan Littlewood.

He has produced and directed many plays in the Damer Hall under the auspices of Gael Linn. Among others these included Gunna Cam agus Slabhra Óir by Seán Ó Tuama and Aggiornamento by Chriostóir Ó Floinn. He also designed the sets for these and many other production. He has directed Ulick O’Connor’s Noh Plays at The Project. As a Radio Producer his drama productions have been selected as RTE’s entries for the

Prix Italia. He has won a National Jacob’s Award for his production and adaptation of Seán Ó Tuama’s Judas Iscariot agus a Bhean.

He has worked as Producer, Director, Series Producer and Script Editor in numerous television one-offs, series and serial drama, often combining several of these skills in one production. These have included The Riordans, Bracken (which launched the career of Gabriel Byrne) Glenroe and Ros na Rún among many others. He also produced and directed the controversial series The Spike until it was withdrawn by RTE itself after complaints from the League of Decency and State interference. He has participated in a documentary in the Scannal series on RTE which deals with well known Irish scandals – including The Spike! (to be transmitted in Autumn 2008). He has won the Celtic Film Festival Drama Award for his production of Tom Murphy’s screenplay, Brigit. He has devised and conducted numerous screenwriting courses. Among these was the initial course for the development of new writers for the series Ros na Rún on TG4. He has conducted several screen acting courses both independently and for the Gaiety School of Acting.

His poetry and short stories have been published in a number of literary magazines including The Kilkenny Magazine and Poetry Ireland. They have also been broadcast on radio in the short story slot and on Sunday Miscellany. His poetry collection Scattering Day 21 Sonnets and Other Poems was published by Seven Towers in 2007.


Noel has two plays currently available:

The Land of She: An adapted for theatre translation of Brian Merriman’s Cuirt on Mhean Oiche, this hillarious play is written for five parts.


He has also completed a short verse play inspired by Synge’s Deirdre of The Sorrows, entitled Áinle and Árdán Are Already Dead.

Oran Ryan is a novelist, poet and playwright from Dublin. He has had poems, short stories and literary critical articles published in various magazines. His first two novels, The Death of Finn and Ten Short Novels by Arthur Kruger were published by Seven Towers in 2006. He is currently working on his fifth novel and had three plays and two screenplays in pre-production. Oran won a 2008 Arts Council Bursary Award.

Doog Wood is a Dublin based poet from North Carolina. His poetry has been widely published in journals and anthologies. His first full collection will be published by The Seven Towers Agency in 2009.

My own reading will consist of part of the final chapter of Somewhere Down The Crazy River, which concludes the book by relating the shipwreck of the Radio Caroline ship Ross Revenge on the Goodwin Sands in November 1991.

All are welcome to attend, it’s always a great evening.

Steve


Last Wednesday Tomorrow Night (reading)

Wednesday 27th August sees the regular “Last Wednesday” writers open-mic night at Cassidys of Westmorland Street, in Dublin city centre.

The event includes readings from Seven Towers featured writers Donal Moloney, Ross Hattaway, Noel Ó Briain,  Oran Ryan, and myself. Guest readers are very welcome on the night – maximum reading 10 minutes (no minimum).

The Last Wednesday readings attract a diverse spectrum of readings including poetry, short stories and non-fiction. 

Donal Moloney is a Waterford born, Dublin based poet and writer.
Ross Hattaway comes back for his first reading in Dublin in several months – as he has been winging his way around the world and reading in Lithuania and Sydney, Australia. Ross was born in Wellington New Zealand, but has lived in Ireland since 1990. He has had many varied jobs and currently works as a civil servant. His first collection of poetry, The Gentle Art of Rotting was published by Seven Towers in 2006. This will be Ross’ first reading in Dublin, after touring Lithuania as part of the Poetry Spring Festival 2008 and seeing his work translated into Lithuanian.

Noel Ó Briain was born in Tralee in Kerry, grew up in Dublin and now resides in Camolin, Co Wexford. He has worked as an actor, director, producer and designer and was head of drama in RTE for a period up to 1988. His first collection of poetry Scattering Day, 21 Sonnets and Other Poems was published by Seven Towers in 2007.

Oran Ryan is a novelist, poet and playwright from Dublin. He has had poems, short stories and literary critical articles published in various magazines. His first two novels, The Death of Finn and Ten Short Novels by Arthur Kruger were published by Seven Towers in 2006. He is currently working on his fifth novel and had three plays and two screenplays in pre-production. Oran won a 2008 Arts Council Bursary Award.

I will be reading more from my forthcoming book Somewhere Down The Crazy River – Life on the Waves with Radio Caroline.

It’s always a fun evening, so do drop in if you are in the area.

Steve


Phantom’s new morning schedule

Great night at the Odessa Club in Dublin yesterday where we launched the new weekday morning schedule for Phantom 105.2.

Though I had to slip away early to present Bedrock, I enjoyed the first couple of hours and managed to catch up with the other part-timers who like me slip in and out of the building at odd times in the hours of darkness.

The new schedule – described below – includes some great presenters, and I really look forward to hearing how it sounds in practice.

The breakfast show, Pure Morning, which will run from 7am-10am, will be hosted by well known DJ, Richie McCormack, supported by Charlotte Flood. Richie has worked with Phantom 105.2 since 2002 and for the past two years has been working with the station presenting its new music show ‘The Producers’ which gives many bands their first exposure on Irish radio and producing the popular ‘Stadium Rock’ on Saturday afternoons. Producer Charlotte is new to Phantom and joins the station from XFM in South Wales.

Michelle Doherty, who also presents Channel 6’s late night interactive music show ‘Nightshift’, will present ‘Finest Worksongs’ from 10am-Noon. Michelle will bring her love and knowledge of the alternative music scene to deliver great music for those at work.

Front Row with Sinéad Ní Mhórdha will air from Noon2pm and bring listeners music, entertainment news and interviews. Sinéad, who’s been described as “Ireland‘s First Female DJ Superstar” by The Star and as “a music junkie and one of Phantom’s “leading lights” by the Sunday Independent, has been with Phantom since 2004. After initially joining in 2004, Sinéad returned to the airwaves on Halloween 2006 to re-join the ranks as Presenter on Phantom 105.2.

Michelle and Charlotte are new to us – welcome! – and they have both done good stuff elsewhere.

Richie has been around at Phantom forever and steadily shining brighter.

Sinead will be doing the new music/entertainment magazine show, Front Row, and if her recent fill-in on Access All Areas is anything to go by, she’ll be brilliant. I remember when she joined in 2004, I used to read the new during her Saturday afternoon show, and thought she was one of the best new voices I had heard in a long time.

I’m off to do Bedrock now, and will be back with Random Access as usual Sunday evening 7-9pm.

Steve


Oxegen Tickets giveaway

(update July 7th – this giveaway is now in the past!! )

This Sunday (July 6th) I’ll be giving away two sets of day tickets to the greatest music festival in Ireland, Oxegen.

I’ll have sets of tickets for the Saturday and the Sunday to give away in the first and second hours of the show.

Tune in to Random Access on Phantom 105.2 for your chance to win – and for two hours of your choice of music from the artists appearing at oxegen. Random Access is the all request show on Phantom, every Sunday evening from 7-9pm.

Phantom is also giving away super whole-weekend with camping tickets every day next week – see The Road To Oxegen for details.

Steve


Two Seven Towers events this week

This Wednesday 25th June 2008 sees the regular “Last Wednesday” open-mic event for writers, hosted by Seven Towers, the Dublin-based small publisher and writers agency who are representing me for my book.

Last Wednesday is always great fun, there is a huge amount of really great new writing featured, including poetry, short stories, and ongoing fiction readings.

Regular readers include Oran Ryan, Noel Ó Briain, & Donal Moloney and there are always many other readers, including some first time readers.

I will be there as usual, reading some excerpts from my own recently completed and as yet unpublished book “Somewhere Down The Crazy River” (non-fiction – my true life account of the last years at sea of Radio Caroline at the end of the 1980s).

Last Wednesday takes place at Cassidys pub in Westmorland Street in Dublin city centre, event starts at 7.30pm.

Later this week, there is another Seven Towers event, “From International Waters”, a series of readings of pieces which explore national and international boundaries and travel, with readers with readers Quincy R Lehr (USA), Roslyn Fuller (Canada), Noel Ó Briain (Ireland), Anamaria Crowe Serrano (Ireland) and others to be confirmed.

This takes place on Sunday 29th June, at 3.30pm in Cassidys.

No entry fee, all welcome.

Steve